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Macedonia: education vs. unemployment – a way out of poverty?

Neda Milevska Kostova and Biljana Kotevska
SEER: Journal for Labour and Social Affairs in Eastern Europe
Vol. 14, No. 2, Inequality in south-east Europe (2011), pp. 251-264
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43293418
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Macedonia: education vs. unemployment – a way out of poverty?
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Abstract

In Macedonia, unemployment and levels of relative poverty are very high. The is putting forward measures to increase the employability of the long-term unemployed and first-time job seekers by reducing illiteracy and providing mandatory primary and secondary education. Simultaneously striking is that the number of people enrolled in higher education is very high and on the increase but, unfortunately, this is only deceptively consolatory: for this approach to become a longterm policy for labour quality improvement, it needs to be coupled with education policy changes and assessments of and adaptation to the labour market. In order to lessen tradeoffs between social, employment and education policies, these should be considered: an increase in co-ordination between key institutions; ensuring their coherence; strategic, realistic planning in the short-, medium- and long-term; regular research and analysis; the design and full utilisation of monitoring mechanisms for the implementation of policies that will enable timely and prompt reactions; and, finally, the sufficient allocation of financial and human resources.

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