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Israel as a Non-Arab State: The Political Implications of Mass Immigration of Non-Jews

Ian S. Lustick
Middle East Journal
Vol. 53, No. 3, Special Issue on Israel (Summer, 1999), pp. 417-433
Published by: Middle East Institute
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4329354
Page Count: 17
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Israel as a Non-Arab State: The Political Implications of Mass Immigration of Non-Jews
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Abstract

Hundreds of thousands of the immigrants from the former Soviet Union who have arrived in Israel between 1989 and the present are not Jewish, yet they legally gain Israeli citizenship under the Law of Return. The flow of so many non-Jewish, non-Arabs into the "Jewish" state greatly complicates the demographic, cultural, statistical, and political landscape. This article explains the legal, bureaucratic, and political conditions which have sustained this immigration and suggests some of its long-term implications for the political identity of the country.

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