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Bionomics: Vernon Lyman Kellogg and the Defense of Darwinism

Mark A. Largent
Journal of the History of Biology
Vol. 32, No. 3 (Winter, 1999), pp. 465-488
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4331546
Page Count: 24
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Abstract

Bionomics was a research approach invented by British biological scientists in the late nineteenth century and adopted by the American entomologist and evolutionist Vernon Lyman Kellogg in the early twentieth century. Kellogg hoped to use bionomics, which was the controlled observation and experimentation of organisms within settings that approximated their natural environments, to overcome the percieved weaknesses in the Darwinian natural selection theory. To this end, he established a bionomics laboratory at Stanford University, widely published results from his bionomic investigations, and encouraged other biological researchers to adopt bionomics.

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