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Journal Article

TWO SAINTS IN THE "OLD ENGLISH MARTYROLOGY"

J. E. Cross
Neuphilologische Mitteilungen
Vol. 78, No. 2 (1977), pp. 101-107
Published by: Modern Language Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43343120
Page Count: 7

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Topics: Martyrdom, Head, Cults, Legends
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TWO SAINTS IN THE "OLD ENGLISH MARTYROLOGY"
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Abstract

Work is needed on the Old English Martyrology to confirm, correct or add to the identifications of O. Cockayne and G. Herzfeld (the editors of the text) so that a comprehensive study may be made which may help to establish its value as a cultural landmark of its comparatively early date. The two items below are a contribution towards a total study. For Eusebius of Vercelli, on which neither of the early editors made a comment, it is argued that the martyrologist conflated material from the Vita and from a sermon, once assigned to Maximus of Turin but now regarded as spurious, yet extant in an eighth-century manuscript. It is also suggested that Bede used another sermon of Pseudo-Maximus for his Martyrology, extant in a manuscript of the seventh/eighth century. For Justus of Beauvais it is argued that the version of his Passio which is closest to the text of the OE martyrology is a fairly full fragment in an Anglo-Saxon hand of the first half of the eighth century. The discussion on Eusebius also sets a firm terminus post quern for the Latin Vita since both Latin sermons drew on it; the discussion on Justus also demonstrates that his cult was known in England at a date before the composition of the Old English Martyrology.

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