Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A NOTE ON THE INTERPRETATION OF "WULF AND EADWACER"

F. Jones
Neuphilologische Mitteilungen
Vol. 86, No. 3 (1985), pp. 323-327
Published by: Modern Language Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43343670
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A NOTE ON THE INTERPRETATION OF "WULF AND EADWACER"
Preview not available

Abstract

In the paper I argue the following four points:— (1) The so-called refrain must involve potential danger to Wulf and be a factor in enforcing the separation between him and the (female) speaker of the poem. (2) (a) The beaducafa must be the same man as Eadwacer, the speaker's husband (see (3) below): lines 10-12 describe their first (or first sexual) encounter, (b) This entails that Wulf's absence be divided into two periods: that of wide-wandering and seldcymas (prior to the marriage) and the enclosure on the island (resulting from the marriage). (3) The threat in lines 16-17 involves the parting of what was never joined. The phrase suggests a parody of a marriage; the wife's threat, therefore, should be directed at the husband. Uncerne earne hwelp must be the same man as Eadwacer. (4) Distribution of names and the addresses to Wulf and Eadwacer is a significant (mimetic) poetic device.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
323
    323
  • Thumbnail: Page 
324
    324
  • Thumbnail: Page 
325
    325
  • Thumbnail: Page 
326
    326
  • Thumbnail: Page 
327
    327