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ROMANTYCZNY KONIEC XVI WIEKU

WŁADYSŁAW TATARKIEWICZ and Z. Zwolska
Roczniki Filozoficzne / Annales de Philosophie / Annals of Philosophy
Vol. 27, No. 1, METAPHYSIQUE, LOGIQUE, HISTOIRE DE LA PHILOSOPHIE / METAPHYSICS, LOGIC, HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY / METAFIZYKA, LOGIKA, HISTORIA FILOZOFII (1979), pp. 245-258
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43407495
Page Count: 14
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ROMANTYCZNY KONIEC XVI WIEKU
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Abstract

The classical theory of rational understanding of art which was obligatory during the Renaissance, in the course of two centuries undergoing only slight changes, somewhere about 1600 fairly radically lost its meaning. Both artists, or theoretitians of art, and scientists, writers and poets gradually diverge from this tradition. The new views were diametrically opposed to the classical views, and seem to be closest to the romantic ones, since it was just in Romantism, when a greater meaning was ascribed to the spirit than to the form, and freedom was evaluated more highly than keeping to the rules. A romantic — in a sense — type of aesthetics can be found not only in Patrizi's theory (art as miraculousness) and Sarbiewski's one (art as creating), but also in Shakespeare (art as an element), or even in Bacon (art as a game and a lucky trick) and Bruno (there are as many rules as good poets). Even Lope dc Vegas and Malherbe's cynical conception of poetry was in a sense a form of romantism, although a negative form. It was a reaction against the bombastic aesthetics: a desire to turn in into a joke: the artist was considered to be a priest, whereas he is not more useful than a skittles player. Hance 1600 can be considered a short romantic epizode in aesthetics, although its briefness does not lessen its value in the history of aesthetics.

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