Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

ZAGADNIENIE AUTONOMICZNOŚCI BIOLOGII (Część I)

ANTONI JERZY CZYŻEWSKI
Roczniki Filozoficzne / Annales de Philosophie / Annals of Philosophy
Vol. 20, No. 3, PHILOSOPHIE DE LA NATURE / FILOZOFIA PRZYRODY (1972), pp. 177-189
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43409979
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
ZAGADNIENIE AUTONOMICZNOŚCI BIOLOGII (Część I)
Preview not available

Abstract

The problem of the autonomy of biology is the focus of interest of the contemporary philosophy of this science. The question is whether the language of the physical science is adequate to express complete knowledge of the biotic system, or if it is necessary to avail oneself of a quantitative means of expressing concepts. An increasing number of biologists and theoreticians of biological knowledge declare themselves in favour of the latter solution, in spite of strong opposition on the part of the adherents of the traditional, reductive point of view. Formulating the matter from the negative aspect, such a notion may be considered right if it can be demonstrated that biologic theories are not to be reduced to the physical. Dealing with this subject the author first discusses the notion and conditions of reduction and its occurrence in contemporary methodologic litterature. Then discussing the question of a suitable interpretation of the reductional thesis in biology, he suggests that it should be understood as a statement of the possibility of reducing the language of theory which describes an "organized complexity" (organizm) to the language of theories which describe either an "organized simplicity" (an inanimate object) or a ″chaotic complexity″ (statistic mass). In conclusion the author analyses the causes which make it difficult to realize the reductional program in biology. They are connected with the fact that it is impossible, in the present state of knowledge about life to fulfill all the formal and not formal conditions of this reduction.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[177]
    [177]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
178
    178
  • Thumbnail: Page 
179
    179
  • Thumbnail: Page 
180
    180
  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186
  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189