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Computerized X-ray tomography

K. R. Hill and R. W. Joyner
Science Progress (1933-)
Vol. 62, No. 246 (Summer 1975), pp. 237-262
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43420301
Page Count: 26
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Computerized X-ray tomography
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Abstract

The article describes a new X-ray technique which produces pictures of horizontal tomographic sections of the head. A series of 28,800 X-ray transmission readings are taken through the head from a number of different angles by means of an X-ray source and crystal detectors which perform a scanning sequence around the head of the patient. These readings are used to form a series of simultaneous equations which are solved by a computer to produce a matrix of X-ray absorption values for points within the section of the head under examination. The examination procedure is simple and is without discomfort or risk to the patient. The results are displayed both as pictures on a cathode ray tube and also in numerical form in a computer print-out, so that the nature of the examination is both qualitative and quantitative. The pictures obtained are examined in a similar way to a conventional radiograph with structures being identified and their shape, size and position defined. Lesions are identified by alterations of normal tissue density or by the displacement or distortion of normal structures. Tissue density may be artificially enhanced by means of intravenous injection of radio-opaque contrast agents and the detection of certain lesions thus improved.

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