Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Rape of Clio: Attitudes to History in Shakespeare's Lucrece

HEATHER DUBROW
English Literary Renaissance
Vol. 16, No. 3, New Perspectives on Shakespeare (AUTUMN 1986), pp. 425-441
Published by: Wiley
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43447196
Page Count: 17
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
The Rape of Clio: Attitudes to History in Shakespeare's Lucrece
Preview not available

Abstract

Shakespeare's The Rape of Lucrece explores not only history but also historiography. Renaissance historians debated such issues as the difficulty of uncovering the truth about distant events, the nature of causality, and the differences between history and poesy. Shakespeare's narrative incorporates these and related subjects by linking differing modes of interpreting history to patterns of human behavior and to literary genres. The Rape of Lucrece also investigates historiographical questions through the juxtaposition of its Argument and the rest of the text. In considering such problems Shakespeare also comments on other aesthetic and linguistic issues, notably the problems of closure and the nature of language and of the reading process.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426
  • Thumbnail: Page 
427
    427
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
429
    429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
430
    430
  • Thumbnail: Page 
431
    431
  • Thumbnail: Page 
432
    432
  • Thumbnail: Page 
433
    433
  • Thumbnail: Page 
434
    434
  • Thumbnail: Page 
435
    435
  • Thumbnail: Page 
436
    436
  • Thumbnail: Page 
437
    437
  • Thumbnail: Page 
438
    438
  • Thumbnail: Page 
439
    439
  • Thumbnail: Page 
440
    440
  • Thumbnail: Page 
441
    441