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A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CLASSIFICATION AND ORDINATION METHODS ON SUCCESSIONAL DATA

S. Mazzoleni, D. D. French and J. Miles
Coenoses
Vol. 6, No. 2 (Summer 1991), pp. 91-101
Published by: Akadémiai Kiadó
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43461056
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CLASSIFICATION AND ORDINATION METHODS ON SUCCESSIONAL DATA
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Abstract

The paper analyzes succession from Callana vulgaris - dominated heathland to woodland dominated by Betula pubescens and B. pendula in Scotland and Northern England. Seven methods were used, classical phytosociological analysis, three ordination methods (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, Detrended Correspondence Analysis, DCA, Bray and Curtis Ordination, BCO) and three classification methods (Cluster Analysis, Indicator Species Analysis, Two Way Indicator Species Analysis). Phytosociological analysis well categorized distinct vegetation types, but failed to classify transitional stages. DCA, BCO using Euclidean distance and in particular PCA clearly displayed the successional trends. Numerical classification did not perform well on the raw data, but ordination complemented by classification (e.g., clustering of the component scores from PCA) gave the best insight into vegetation patterns. The suitability of different methods according to the nature of the data to be analyzed is discussed.

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