Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Arts and Culture of Parun, Kafiristan's "Sacred Valley"

MAX KLIMBURG
Arts Asiatiques
Vol. 57 (2002), pp. 51-68
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43484348
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Arts and Culture of Parun, Kafiristan's "Sacred Valley"
Preview not available

Abstract

Among the former "Kafirs of the Hindu Kush" in northeast Afghanistan, who were reputed as savage and "bloodthirsty" kafir [heathen] in the surrounding Islamic world until their forced-upon Islamization in 1896, the Paruni had a special position. Living in six small villages in the Parun Valley located between the areas of the more militant and competitive Kati, Waigal and Ashkun Kafirs, they had established a sacred notion about their region and their culture. The valley was dotted with temples and village-based clan-houses, am∂́l, where a great number of deities, most of them also known under the same or other names to their neighbours, was worshipped and invoked under the guidance of priests, münd. Inmidst the valley, in Kushteki, once stood the famous great temple of the top deity Māra, who was revered as Imra and Yamrai by the Kati and Waigali. It was the religious and thus also the pilgrimage centre of Kafiristan, renamed Nuristan or "Land of Light" after the Islamization. In all the temples and clan-owned am∂́l, deities were represented as statues and figures carved into the pillars. Many of them have survived the sudden, highly destructive culture change 106 years ago. Les Paruni, au nord-est de l'Afghanistan, occupent une place particulière parmi ceux que l'on appelait autrefois « Kafirs de l'Hindu Kush », et qui étaient réputés dans les pays musulmans alentour être des païens [kafir] sauvages et « sanguinaires » jusqu'à leur islamisation forcée en 1896. Répartis en six petits villages localisés dans la vallée du Parun, au coeur des régions occupées par d'autres Kafirs plus forts et belliqueux (Kati, Waigali et Ashkun), les Paruni attribuaient un caractère sacré à leur culture et à leur vallée. Celle-ci était parsemée de temples et de maisons de clan ou am∂́l basées dans chaque village. De nombreuses divinités, pour la plupart connues de leurs voisins, sous le même nom ou sous un autre, y étaient adorées et invoquées sous la direction de prêtres, les münd. A Kushteki, au milieu de la vallée, se trouvait autrefois le célèbre grand temple de Māra, divinité suprême révérée sous le nom d'Imra ou Yamrai par les Kati et les Waigali. Ce village était le centre religieux et le lieu de pèlerinage du Kafiristan - renommé Nuristan ou « Pays de la Lumière » après son islamisation. Dans tous les temples et maisons de clan des Paruni, se trouvaient des représentations de divinités : statues ou figures sculptées sur les piliers, dont beaucoup ont survécu au changement de culture, soudain et destructeur, d'il y a 106 ans. 1896 年にイスラム化が強いられるまでは, 周辺イスラム世界から は野蛮で「流血を好む」カフィール( 異端者) との名声をはせていたァ フガニスタン北東の「ヒンズークシュのカフィール」と古来呼ばれた諸 民族の中 は, パルニ族は特別の位置を占めていた。パルニ族はより強 く好戦的な他のカフィール族, カティ, ワイガル, アシュクンのいる地 帯であるパルンの谷間の六つの小村に分散していたが, 彼らの地域や文 化に神的な性格を与 たからである。この谷間には寺院や村毎の部族の 家「ァメル」が散在しており, その近隣の部族には同名か異名で知られ ていた数多くの神々が, 神官ミュンドの指導のもとに崇められ, 祈りが ささげられた。谷間の中央のクシュテ には, カティ族やワイガル族に よってイムラとかヤムライの名で崇められていた最高神マラの有名な大 寺院があった。この村は宗教上の中心地で, イスラム化以後はヌリスタ ンまたは「光の国」と呼ばれたカフィリスタンの巡礼の地であった。パ ルニ族のすべての寺院や部族の家 了 メル には神々の姿が彫像として 置かれたり柱に彫りこまれたりしていた。その多くは 106 年前の突然 の破壊的な文化異変にもかかわらず生き残った。

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68