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SALVADORIAN ETHNIC PRIDE: A Bridge for Reducing Mother-Daughter Conflict Due to Acculturation Into Canadian Society

Mirna E. Carranza
Canadian Social Work Review / Revue canadienne de service social
Vol. 29, No. 1 (2012), pp. 61-85
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43486269
Page Count: 25
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
SALVADORIAN ETHNIC PRIDE: A Bridge for Reducing Mother-Daughter Conflict Due to Acculturation Into Canadian Society
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Abstract

This article examines acculturation conflict between Salvadorian mothers and their daughters living in a mid-sized Ontario city. Six joint interviews with adolescent and adult daughters and their respective mothers were conducted. Sixteen individual qualitative interviews with mothers and separately with their adolescent or adult daughters were carried out as well (N = 32). A grounded theory approach was employed to explore emergent acculturation themes. Findings highlight how Salvadorian immigrant mothers in Canada guide their adolescent daughters through the acculturation process, how the daughters respond to their mothers' guidance, the nature of the conflict that emerges in this process, and the conditions under which the conflict is increased or reduced. It appears that tension is eased when daughters come to understand and accept the ongoing relevance of Salvadorian heritage to their lives in Canada. Cet article examine le conflit d'acculturation entre les mères salvadoriennes et leurs filles qui habitent une ville ontarienne de population moyenne. Nous avons mené six entrevues durant lesquelles les mères et leurs filles adolescentes ou adultes respectives étaient ensembles. De plus, nous avons mené 16 entrevues qualitatives durant lesquelles les mères et leurs filles adolescentes ou adultes étaient séparées. La théorie ancrée fut employée pour explorer les thèmes émergents d'acculturation. Nous avons observé comment les mères salvadoriennés immigrantes au Canada guident leurs filles adolescentes au long du processus d'acculturation, comment les filles répondent aux conseils de leurs mères, la nature du conflit qui émerge de ce processus et les conditions sous lesquelles ce conflit augmente ou diminue. Il semble que la tension s'apaise lorsque les filles peuvent comprendre et accepter le maintien de la pertinence de leur héritage salvadorien par rapport à leur vie au Canada.

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