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Journal Article

Cycads of Colombia

Dennis Wm. Stevenson
Botanical Review
Vol. 70, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 2004), pp. 194-234
Published by: Springer on behalf of New York Botanical Garden Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4354474
Page Count: 41
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Cycads of Colombia
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Abstract

There are three genera of cycads in Colombia: Cycas, with two introduced and unnaturalized species; the endemic genus Chigua, with two species; and Zamia, with 16 species, seven of which are endemic. Keys to all species are given, as well as complete descriptions, synonymy, types, exisiccatae, distributional data, and conservation status as used in the 1997 IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants. Floristically, Zamiaceae is represented in Colombia by four elements: a Chocó, southern Córdoba, and northeastern Antioquia element, with the endemic genus, Chigua, and six species of Zamia, Z. amplifolia, Z. disodon, Z. manicata, Z. roezlii, Z. chigua, and Z. obliqua, with the first two endemic to Colombia; a montane element in the northern Cordillera Occidental, with two endemic species, Z. montana and Z. wallisii; a Río Magdalena Valley element, with Z. muricata, Z. poeppigiana, and the endemic Z. encephalartoides; and an element east of the Andes and principally Amazonian, with four other species, Z. amazonum, Z. lecointei, Z. ulei, and the nearly endemic Z. hymenophyllidia.

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