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Lotteries for Education: Windfall or Hoax?

Donald E. Miller and Patrick A. Pierce
State & Local Government Review
Vol. 29, No. 1 (Winter, 1997), pp. 34-42
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4355168
Page Count: 9
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Lotteries for Education: Windfall or Hoax?
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Abstract

During the 1980s and into the 1990s, states have increasingly adopted lotteries as relatively painless means of generating revenue. This revenue is often earmarked for a particular purpose; most popularly, education. Citizens infer that such a designation of lottery monies increases the state's ability to allocate more for that purpose. The authors investigate this assumption and find mixed results. In the short term, state spending for education increases, but in the long term, the rate of spending declines compared to the rate prior to the lottery.

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