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'The Weaker Sections': Deliberations at the Tenali Seminar

H. S. Verma and J. V. Raghavendra Rao
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 5, No. 26 (Jun. 27, 1970), pp. 1018-1022
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4360174
Page Count: 5
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'The Weaker Sections': Deliberations at the Tenali Seminar
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Abstract

Oft-repeated resolves of those in authority to improve the lot of the weaker sections, in general, and of Harijans among them, in particular, have now acquired an air of unreality. Indeed, the will to act upon these 'resolves' has been so weak that one begins to doubt their sincerity. This tendency was once again in evidence at the Tenali Seminar on 'The Directive Principles of State Policy vis-a-vis State Action with reference to Weaker Sections' organised by V S R College from January 7 through January 10, 1970. The main object of the Seminar was to highlight the problems of the weaker sections - women, Scheduled Castes and Tribes, other Backward Classes and the suppressed sections of thereligious minorities - and to evolve action-oriented programmes to improve their living conditions and to bring them at par with the advanced sections. The Seminar was to examine the extent to which state action is informed by the directive principles and to suggestmeasures for their active involvement in the democratic process at all levels. Further the Seminar was also expected to examine to what extent the graded inequality of the Hindu social organisation was coming in the way of enforcing social justice and to suggest programmes for the emergence of a casteless society.

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