Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Lessons Learned from American Educational Legislation for Canadian Educators: No Child Left Behind and the Ontario Aboriginal Education Framework

Lorenzo Cherubini
Journal of American Indian Education
Vol. 49, No. 1/2 (2010), pp. 69-85
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43608590
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Lessons Learned from American Educational Legislation for Canadian Educators: No Child Left Behind and the Ontario Aboriginal Education Framework
Preview not available

Abstract

This article outlines the similarities between the U.S. No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Ontario Ministry of Education's recently released First Nation, Métis, and Inuit Education Policy Framework in the context of the historical and contemporary educational realities of American Indian/Alaska Native and Aboriginal peoples in the United States and Canada. The key outcomes of NCLB are considered nearly eight years into its implementation in American public schools and serve as a premise to the discussion of the ideological disconnect between the Policy Framework and Aboriginal students' academic achievement in Ontario, including the inappropriate reliance on standardized testing in light of Aboriginal students' learning styles. Several key challenges are presented to Ontario and Canadian educational policymakers, teachers, and teacher educators based on the lessons that can be learned from the implementation of public educational policy in the United States.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85