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Traditionelle Gesellschaft, Regionalentwicklung und nationaler Rahmen in Ägypten

Frank Bliss
Sociologus
Neue Folge / New Series, Vol. 34, No. 2 (1984), pp. 97-120
Published by: Duncker & Humblot GmbH
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43645193
Page Count: 24
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Traditionelle Gesellschaft, Regionalentwicklung und nationaler Rahmen in Ägypten
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Abstract

Egyptian development politics nowadays tries to reclaim new areas in the Western Desert to enlarge the arable land which only amounts to 3.5 per cent of the whole territory. The majority of all regional development projects in agriculture are affected by local circumstances and Egyptian national politics. Structural problems such as subsidies in provisions or an unmethodical expansion of higher education often prevent any success in the desert reclamation projects as they cause an increasing emigration out of the lesser populated provinces. Sometimes the development projects themselves are the reason for emigration. The author has tried to prove, using the example of the New Valley Oases area, that governmental campaigns don't care in many cases about ecological, social or economic conditions. They destroy the traditional way of life without providing new perspectives. In this way regional development can effect precisely the opposite of its original aim, namely to create new homes for parts of the increasing Egyptian population.

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