Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

LEGAL ARGUMENTATION IN HYPEREIDES "AGAINST TIMANDROS"

LENE RUBINSTEIN
Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies
Vol. 52 (2009), pp. 149-159
Published by: Wiley
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43655779
Page Count: 11
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
LEGAL ARGUMENTATION IN HYPEREIDES "AGAINST TIMANDROS"
Preview not available

Abstract

One of the more striking claims made by the speaker of Against Timandros is that guardians who had responsibility for groups of orphaned siblings were required by law to bring up the children together in the same household. In the present paper it is argued that Athenian legislation on orphans did not explicitly prescribe this, although there may have been a widespread consensus that, ideally, orphaned siblings ought not be separated. It is suggested that what the law actually prescribed was that the children should be brought up where their needs were most likely to be met, and that Hypereides' interpretation of the wording of the statute is as tendentious as it is clever. The way in which the speaker constructs his legal argumentation as part of a very effective character assassination of Timandros resembles the very sophisticated tactics found in Hypereides' speeches Against Athenogenes and For Euxenippos.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159