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Relationship between Small-Scale and Large-Scale Industry A Different View

T. Thomas
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 14, No. 9 (Mar. 3, 1979), pp. M29+M31+M33+M35-M36
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4367390
Page Count: 5
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Relationship between Small-Scale and Large-Scale Industry A Different View
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Abstract

This article seeks to analyse the factors underlying the policy of promoting small-scale sector and to expose some of the major limitations of this policy. The author argues that indiscriminate promotion of small-scale industry, defined merely in terms of size of capital, need not result in increased employment or the most efficient use of scarce resources like capital and land. Very important factors like consumer interest, market linkage, the efficient use of resources and the need for innovation necessitate the continued growth of large-scale industry. The role of the small-scale sector has, therefore, to be seen as complementary to that of the large-scale one and not one of exclusive dominance in a widening range of activities.

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