Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Energy Crisis and Its Impact on Energy Consumers in Third World: II

D. R. Pendse
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 15, No. 4 (Jan. 26, 1980), pp. 175-177+179+181-184
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4368359
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Energy Crisis and Its Impact on Energy Consumers in Third World: II
Preview not available

Abstract

Though they woke up to the problem only in October 1973, the energy crisis had long been a writing on the wall for the industrial world and, even more, for the countries of the Third World. For a country like India, the immediate impact was traumatic for all sectors of energy consumers. Two options are now open: (i) to keep augmenting supplies of fossil-fuel energy to match ever-increasing consumption (the hard path); and (ii) to conserve such non-renewable fossil-fuel sources of supply and tap increasingly the renewable sources (the soft path). The soft path is the more workable option for the industrial world as also for the Third World; though there will be immense difficulties in its acceptance and inevitable time-lags in its implementation. The industrial nations, the author argues, need to come forth to help the Third World adopt the soft path. They have the wherewithal to conduct research into the abundant base of renewable energy sources of the Third World countries, to develop appropriate equipment and appliances and to make them available on soft terms. Consumers and their organisations, particularly in the Third World, need to adopt concrete programmes aimed at creating awareness of the dimensions and implications of the energy crisis. [This article has been published in two parts. The first part appeared last week.]

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
175
    175
  • Thumbnail: Page 
176
    176
  • Thumbnail: Page 
177
    177
  • Thumbnail: Page 
179
    179
  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184