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Pattern of Commercial Farming in Guntur District

V. N. Reddy
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 20, No. 51/52 (Dec. 21-28, 1985), pp. A137-A152
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4375144
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Pattern of Commercial Farming in Guntur District
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Abstract

In recent debates on the changes in Indian agriculture, commercial farming occupies an important place. Guntur district of Andhra Pradesh is regarded as one of the leading areas in regard to commercialisation of agriculture. The district is well known for tobacco and chillies. After the advent of the Nagarjuna Sagar waters in 1968-69, it has gained a distinct place in the country's cotton map on account of its significant contribution to the production of import-substituting superior long and extra-long staple cottons like MCU-5, Varalaxmi and Suvin. The cultivation of these varieties of cotton requires substantial monetary outlays as well as careful application of techniques like crop rotation, preparatory tillage, etc, for better yields. During the period 1970-71 to 1979-80, there has been a four-fold increase in the average value per hectare from the cotton crop in Guntur district. Against this background, this study focuses on (i) agricultural changes in Guntur district from the beginning of this century, (ii) factors responsible for the shift of cropping pattern towards cotton as against other commercial crops as well as foodgrain crops, (iii) profitability of cotton cultivation across different socio-economic classes, and, (iv) the marketing channels for cotton and seasonality in prices of cotton.

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