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MONASTERI SULLE STRADE DEL POTERE. PROGETTI DI INTERVENTO SUL PAESAGGIO POLITICO MEDIEVALE FRA LE ALPI E LA PIANURA

Giuseppe Sergi
Quaderni storici
NUOVA SERIE, Vol. 21, No. 61 (1), Vie di comunicazione e potere (aprile 1986), pp. 33-56
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43777947
Page Count: 24
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
MONASTERI SULLE STRADE DEL POTERE. PROGETTI DI INTERVENTO SUL PAESAGGIO POLITICO MEDIEVALE FRA LE ALPI E LA PIANURA
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Abstract

A basic and strict choice has been made in selecting one of the two elements in the binomial concept of roads and power: the area of road layout scarcely subject to alterations, between Cozians Alps and Torino's plains from the VIIIth to the XIIIth century. Against this the local policies of three different and subsequent types of medieval powers have been assessed: the royal power, the dynastic power of public officials' great families, and the communal power. Monasteries built along the roads are shown to be points of reference where power coagulates, and mirror in their different layouts different political stages: here are analyzed Novalesa, S. Giusto di Susa, and S. Giacomo di Torino. Roads as such can be variously determinant to the origin of each monastery, but are always fundamental factors in their successive development. In medieval times public authority in order to gain the maximum of profit by the control of a road had to guarantee its functioning and its welfare organization. It did so by giving religious institutions a proxy and by renouncing to impair their political opponents through roads control.

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