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VEDOVE DI CITTÀ E VEDOVE DI CAMPAGNA NELLA FRANCIA PREINDUSTRIALE: AGGREGATO DOMESTICO, TRASMISSIONE E STRATEGIE FAMILIARI DI SOPRAVVIVENZA

Antoinette Fauve-Chamoux
Quaderni storici
NUOVA SERIE, Vol. 33, No. 98 (2), Gestione dei patrimoni e diritti delle donne (AGOSTO 1998), pp. 301-332
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43779129
Page Count: 32
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
VEDOVE DI CITTÀ E VEDOVE DI CAMPAGNA NELLA FRANCIA PREINDUSTRIALE: AGGREGATO DOMESTICO, TRASMISSIONE E STRATEGIE FAMILIARI DI SOPRAVVIVENZA
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Abstract

The article addresses women and widowhood in both urban and rural settings during the pre-industrial period. It attempts to shed some light on the specific characteristics of widowhood, from the 17th century on, as well as the role of widows in strategies for assuring continuity of property ownership. In this period, widowhood and remarriage were common since marital unions were shortened due to the high mortality rate. Demographic transition and social-economic changes modified the model of remarriage and, as a result, types of households. With the ageing of the population and the average lengthening of the life span, the aged female population became a growing burden for society and families. In France, the rural population was more able to respond to new family situations than the urban population. The role of kinship was particularly visible in the South of France and in the regions where extended family units were common. The role of widows, living with the favoured heir, grew in importance. Family continuity, in time and space, was sought by all means available, whatever the blows of destiny and the temptation for young adults to leave the proletarised countryside.

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