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Bali's Killing Fields Thirty Years Ago

Jan Breman
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 31, No. 16/17 (Apr. 20-27, 1996), pp. 997-999
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4404051
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Bali's Killing Fields Thirty Years Ago
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Abstract

Thirty years ago, the myth of Bali's harmonious and spiritual community, inherited from the colonial era, seemed to have been destroyed for all time. That was when Bali fell victim to the explosion of violence that brought death to between 5,00,000 and a million Indonesians. The number of people killed on the island is uncertain, but it cannot have been far less than 80,000. Within the space of a few weeks, one in every 20 Balinese had been killed. And if the perpetrators are added to the number of their victims, and taking into consideration the many more who were detained secretly and indefinitely, one in every three households became involved in this 'purge' of what was said to be a paradise on earth. And then the curtain of silence was drawn.

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