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Globalisation and Threat to Seed Security: Case of Transgenic Cotton Trials in India

Vandana Shiva, Ashok Emani and Afsar H. Jafri
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 34, No. 10/11 (Mar. 6-19, 1999), pp. 601-613
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4407732
Page Count: 13
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Globalisation and Threat to Seed Security: Case of Transgenic Cotton Trials in India
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Abstract

There are high social and ecological costs linked to globalisation of non-sustainable agriculture which have been experienced in all commercially-grown and chemically-farmed crops in all regions. While the benefits of globalisation go to the seeds and chemical corporations through expanding markets, the cost and risks are exclusively born by the small farmers and landless peasants. While the commercial private seed supply system needs strong state regulation, farmer seed supply should function free of state interference with strong community control and public participation. Strong biosafety regulation with public participation is both a democratic and an ecological imperative.

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