Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Calcutta Diary

A. M.
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 36, No. 12 (Mar. 24-30, 2001), pp. 984-985
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4410413
Page Count: 2
  • More info
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

The absurd economic laws and theories that have dominated western societies have succeeded in doing so because most of these societies have an infrastructure of inequity and inequality. The pretence of perfect competition helps the expansion of monopoly in the system, for it enables the strong to confront in the market the weak, who are crushed in no time. To assuage their left-over morality the rich have also developed a second-order formulation: if a tiny fragment of the population turn out to be filthily rich, a part of their income will trickle down and take care of the problems of the poor. Nationally as well as internationally, we are at the moment helpless victims of such trivial theorisations and actions based on them.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
984
    984
  • Thumbnail: Page 
985
    985