Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Food and Power in Bihar and Jharkhand: PDS and Its Functioning

Jos Mooij
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 36, No. 34 (Aug. 25-31, 2001), pp. 3289-3295+3297-3299
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4411032
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Food and Power in Bihar and Jharkhand: PDS and Its Functioning
Preview not available

Abstract

Public distribution of foodgrains in India is a national policy, which exists in all states. In some states, however, the public distribution system (PDS) works much better than in other states. The undivided state of Bihar (now the new Bihar and Jharkhand) is one of the states in which the policy works poorly. It is important to understand why this is the case. Generally, policy changes and recommendations do not take the specificities of particular states into account. Yet, for the PDS performance to improve in Bihar and Jharkhand, it is absolutely necessary to understand why it works as it does, what the main bottlenecks are and where there are possibilities for improvement, if any. This paper makes such an attempt: it describes the PDS in Bihar and Jharkhand, not only in terms of how it fails and what it does not accomplish, but also in terms of what it is and what it does. It is shown that while many people do benefit from the present set-up, there are also people within almost all categories of stakeholders who are dissatisfied with the large-scale misappropriation of foodgrains. It is argued that there is scope for change, but change requires strategic political manoeuvring and initially a low-key approach in order not to awaken and antagonise strong vested interests.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
3289
    3289
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3290
    3290
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3291
    3291
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3292
    3292
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3293
    3293
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3294
    3294
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3295
    3295
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3297
    3297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3298
    3298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3299
    3299