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Reconciling Conservation with Emancipatory Politics

K. Ullas Karanth
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 40, No. 46 (Nov. 12-18, 2005), pp. 4803-4805
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4417385
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reconciling Conservation with Emancipatory Politics
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Abstract

While the Tiger Task Force in its report claims to have unleashed a paradigm shift towards a new "Indian way" of saving tigers, its vision is short on specifics as to how all this can actually work on the ground. Its model boldly advocates balancing nature conservation imperatives with emancipatory politics, yet it does not appear to have carefully analysed the many state level factors that are perhaps responsible for the collapse of tiger protection mechanisms in the country. Instead, the task force expounds a predominantly Delhi-centric vision of top-down tiger policy-making and implementation. This was perhaps inevitable given the composition of the task force and its reliance on the ministry of environment for information and ideas.

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