If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Gendering Oral History of Partition: Interrogating Patriarchy

Anjali Bhardwaj Datta
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 41, No. 22 (Jun. 3-9, 2006), pp. 2229-2235
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4418296
Page Count: 7
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Gendering Oral History of Partition: Interrogating Patriarchy
Preview not available

Abstract

Women's lives in the Punjab, hitherto regulated by strictly set patriarchal norms, saw unexpected and almost drastic change as Partition set in. The motif of Partition has centred on the humiliation and trauma that women encountered and witnessed. While it is true that women were, in countless instances, Partition's ubiquitous victims, in very many ways the chaos and temporality of the post-Partition period allowed several of them to redefine themselves anew. This was not a self-conscious effort, the government too took on the role of "care-giver" but the exercise of "redefinition" questioned the sanctity of old notions and gave several women a new identity altogether.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
2229
    2229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2230
    2230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2231
    2231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2232
    2232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2233
    2233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2234
    2234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2235
    2235