Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Poet at Colonus: Nightingales in Sophocles

Aara Suksi
Mnemosyne
Fourth Series, Vol. 54, Fasc. 6 (Dec., 2001), pp. 646-658
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4433273
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Poet at Colonus: Nightingales in Sophocles
Preview not available

Abstract

The presence of the nightingales in Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus evokes associations of a long mythico-poetic tradition in which the nightingale is known not only for her sweet song, but also for her association with lament, arising from the tragic myth of Procne and Tereus. These associations make the nightingale an important symbol of tragic poetry and its transformative function, and their presence at Colonus reminds us that Sophocles himself was born there.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[646]
    [646]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
647
    647
  • Thumbnail: Page 
648
    648
  • Thumbnail: Page 
649
    649
  • Thumbnail: Page 
650
    650
  • Thumbnail: Page 
651
    651
  • Thumbnail: Page 
652
    652
  • Thumbnail: Page 
653
    653
  • Thumbnail: Page 
654
    654
  • Thumbnail: Page 
655
    655
  • Thumbnail: Page 
656
    656
  • Thumbnail: Page 
657
    657
  • Thumbnail: Page 
658
    658