Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Predictors of Response to Therapy for Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Richard Platt
Reviews of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 6, Supplement 3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Biology, Immunology, and Therapy: A Cefsulodin Symposium (Sep. - Oct., 1984), pp. S759-S768
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4453507
Page Count: 10
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Predictors of Response to Therapy for Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Preview not available

Abstract

Data from 410 courses of cefsulodin therapy for infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used to determine the factors that correlated with three outcomes: bacteriologic cure, clinical response, and the occurrence of adverse effects. The factors that were evaluated were site of infection, number of infected sites, prior antibiotic therapy, concurrent antibiotic therapy, maximum daily dose of cefsulodin, pretreatment status (blood pressure, white blood cell count, hemoglobin and creatinine levels, liver function tests), age, sex, and assignment to cefsulodin via randomization. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors that contributed independently to the outcome. Regression analysis indicated that three factors were significantly associated with bacteriologic cure: age, site of infection, and pretreatment hemoglobin values. Regression analysis indicated that the following four variables were significant correlates of satisfactory clinical response: site of infection, the presence of more than one infected site, diastolic blood pressure before therapy, and prior antibiotic therapy. Regression analysis also indicated that two factors, maximum daily dose of cefsulodin and duration of therapy, were the only significant predictors of the occurrence of adverse effects.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
S759
    S759
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S760
    S760
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S761
    S761
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S762
    S762
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S763
    S763
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S764
    S764
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S765
    S765
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S766
    S766
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S767
    S767
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S768
    S768