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Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Correctional Facilities: A Review

Anne Spaulding, Becky Stephenson, Grace Macalino, William Ruby, Jennifer G. Clarke and Timothy P. Flanigan
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Vol. 35, No. 3 (Aug. 1, 2002), pp. 305-312
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4462067
Page Count: 8
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Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Correctional Facilities: A Review
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Abstract

It is estimated that up to one-fourth of the people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States pass through a correctional facility each year. The majority of persons who enter a correctional facility today will return home in the near future. Most inmates with HIV infection acquire it in the outside community; prison does not seem to be an amplifying reservoir. How correctional health services deal with the HIV-infected person has important implications to the overall care of HIV-infected people in the community. Routine HIV testing is well accepted. Combination antiretroviral therapy has been associated with a reduction in mortality in prisons. A link between area HIV specialists and correctional health care providers is an important partnership for ensuring that HIV-infected patients have optimal care both inside prison and after release.

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