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Effects of Long-Term, Medically Supervised, Drug-Free Treatment and Methadone Maintenance Treatment on Drug Users' Emergency Department Use and Hospitalization

Barbara J. Turner, Christine Laine, Chuya P. Yang and Walter W. Hauck
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Vol. 37, Bloodborne and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Drug Abusers in the United States, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain / Infecciones Transmitidas por la Sangre y Aquellas Transmitidas Sexualmente entre Usuarios de Drogas Intravenosas (UDI) y sus Parejas en el Hemisferio Occidental: Un Intercambio de las Experiencias y las Lecciones Aprendidas (Dec. 15, 2003), pp. S457-S463
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4462701
Page Count: 7
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Effects of Long-Term, Medically Supervised, Drug-Free Treatment and Methadone Maintenance Treatment on Drug Users' Emergency Department Use and Hospitalization
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Abstract

We examined the effect of drug treatment in 1996 on repeated (≥2) emergency department visits and hospitalization in 1997 in a cohort of New York State Medicaid-enrolled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative drug users. In HIV-positive drug users, the adjusted odds of repeated emergency department visits were increased for those receiving no long-term treatment (odds ratio [OR], 1.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-2.75), whereas the adjusted odds for those receiving methadone treatment and those receiving drug-free treatment for ≥6 months did not differ. The adjusted odds of hospitalization in the HIV-positive group were higher for those receiving long-term methadone treatment (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.14-2.55) and for those receiving no long-term treatment (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.29-2.88), compared with those receiving drug-free treatment. In the HIV-negative group, these associations were similar but weaker. For both HIV-positive and HIV-negative drug users, long-term drug-free treatment was at least as effective as long-term methadone treatment in reducing use of services indicative of poorer access to care and/or poorer health.

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