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Moxifloxacin for the Treatment of Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Sanjay Sethi
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Vol. 41, Supplement 2. Moxifloxacin: An Assessment after 5 Years of Clinical Use (Jul. 15, 2005), pp. S177-S185
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4463383
Page Count: 9
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Moxifloxacin for the Treatment of Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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Abstract

Background/purpose. The significant impact of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is now recognized. This recognition has led to increased efforts to provide evidence-based, appropriate treatment of AECOPD, to minimize its negative impact. This article reviews the bacterial etiology of AECOPD and clinical trials (both placebo-controlled and antibiotic comparison trials) that support the use of antibiotics for AECOPD, with an emphasis on the role of newer fluoroquinolones for the treatment of patients with this condition. A discussion of patient stratification that permits identification of those who require initial aggressive antibiotic therapy is presented. Main findings. Among the treatment modalities for exacerbations, the role and choice of antibiotics is hotly debated. Current evidence supports the use of antibiotics in the treatment of AECOPD, because bacterial pathogens cause approximately half the exacerbations, and because empirical antibiotics have a significant benefit in most exacerbations. Several recent investigations have aided in the development of a rational antibiotic strategy for AECOPD. These include outcome studies that have identified patients who are likely to have a poor outcome of their exacerbation and, therefore, are candidates for aggressive initial antibiotic therapy. Studies of the new fluoroquinolone agents have shown superior short- and long-term clinical results among patients with AECOPD who are at risk of a poor outcome. Conclusions. Theoretical concerns about the emergence of resistance to the fluoroquinolones dictate not only the appropriate use of these drugs but, also, the use of the most-potent agents available in this class, to sustain their usefulness over time. Such selected use of the new fluoroquinolones balances individual benefit with societal concerns regarding the use of these agents for the treatment of AECOPD.

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