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Representative Styles and Legislative Behavior

Donald A. Gross
The Western Political Quarterly
Vol. 31, No. 3 (Sep., 1978), pp. 359-371
DOI: 10.2307/447736
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/447736
Page Count: 13
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Representative Styles and Legislative Behavior
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Abstract

The research reported in this article examines the relationships between the representative styles of congressmen and four types of legislative behavior. It is found that representative style has little or no impact on the campaign activities of congressmen. In relation to a second type of legislative behavior, attempts to "tap" constituency opinions, it is found that delegates do make a greater effort to "tap" constituency opinions than either politicos or trustees. This is the only type of legislative behavior, however, that representative style seems to be related to. Representative style is found to be unrelated to the party support scores of congressmen. With regard to a fourth type of legislative behavior, representative style is not consistently related to the degree to which congressmen voted in accordance with their constituencies' opinions. Furthermore, the representative styles of congressmen do not greatly influence the representational process as hypothesized by the Miller-Stokes model of constituency influence. Thus, this articles indicates that representative style does not seem to influence legislative behavior in situations where its impact should be significant.

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