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Antimicrobial Resistance Prevalence Rates in Hospital Antibiograms Reflect Prevalence Rates among Pathogens Associated with Hospital-Acquired Infections

Scott K. Fridkin, Jonathan R. Edwards, Fred C. Tenover, Robert P. Gaynes and John E. McGowan, Jr.
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Vol. 33, No. 3 (Aug. 1, 2001), pp. 324-329
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4482737
Page Count: 6
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Antimicrobial Resistance Prevalence Rates in Hospital Antibiograms Reflect Prevalence Rates among Pathogens Associated with Hospital-Acquired Infections
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Abstract

To determine whether routine antibiograms (summaries reporting resistance of all tested isolates) reflect resistance rates among pathogens associated with hospital-acquired infections, we compared data collected from 2 different surveillance components in the same 166 intensive care units (ICUs). ICUs reported data during the same months to both the infection-based surveillance and the laboratory-based surveillance. Paired comparisons of the percentage of isolates resistant were made between systems within each ICU. No significant differences existed (P > .05) between the percentage of isolates resistant from the infection-based system and laboratory-based system for all antimicrobial-resistant organisms studied, except methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus species. The mean difference in percentage resistance was higher from the infection-based system than the laboratory-based system for S. aureus (mean difference, +8%, P < .001) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (mean difference, +9%, P < .001). Overall, hospital antibiograms reflected susceptibility patterns among isolates associated with hospital-acquired infections. Hospital antibiograms may underestimate the relative frequency of methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus species when associated with hospital-acquired infections.

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