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Journal Article

Modern Congressional Election Theory Meets the 1992 House Elections

Sunil Ahuja, Staci L. Beavers, Cynthia Berreau, Anthony Dodson, Patrick Hourigan, Steven Showalter, Jeff Walz and John R. Hibbing
Political Research Quarterly
Vol. 47, No. 4 (Dec., 1994), pp. 909-921
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc. on behalf of the University of Utah
DOI: 10.2307/448865
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/448865
Page Count: 13
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Modern Congressional Election Theory Meets the 1992 House Elections
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Abstract

The events surrounding the 1992 congressional elections-the check-kiting scandal, the last opportunity to convert campaign funds to personal funds, redistricting, and a public allegedly soured on Congress subsequent to pay raises, scandals, and the Thomas-Hill hearings-provided a unique opportunity to test the prevailing models of congressional elections. In this research, we analyze the forces that contributed to the coming of 110 new members to the 103rd Congress. Our conclusion is that, while some aspects of the 1992 elections were unusual, the basic statutes of modern congressional election theory still apply if some needed, friendly amendments are added. Candidates continued to behave strategically, for example, but 1992 indicates the importance of developing the concept of strategic behavior for incumbents as well as challengers.

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