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A Multinational Injury Surveillance System Pilot Project in Africa

Diego E. Zavala, Simon Bokongo, Ime A. John, Senoga Ismail Mpanga, Robert E. Mtonga, Zakari Mohammed Aminu, Walter Odhiambo and Peter Olupot-Olupot
Journal of Public Health Policy
Vol. 28, No. 4, Special Section: Small Arms and Light Weapons in Africa: A Major Challenge to Public Health and Development (2007), pp. 432-441
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4498982
Page Count: 10
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A Multinational Injury Surveillance System Pilot Project in Africa
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Abstract

This paper describes the development of a pilot project to test the implementation of an epidemiological surveillance system for intentional (violent) and non-intentional injuries, at emergency departments in selected hospitals in five African countries applying the World Health Organization's guidelines. We outline obstacles and opportunities encountered during the process. By definition, a surveillance system systematically collects, reviews, and evaluates information to understand the context in which specific injuries occur. Implementation in diverse sociocultural environments in Zambia, Uganda, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, and Kenya has provided an opportunity to gather reliable data on injuries for comparisons between these countries. Analysis of the detailed information may permit researchers to generate evidence-based recommendations. Addressed to public authorities, and health authorities in particular, they can help address injury incidence in their communities from a public health perspective.

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