Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

The Ice Regime of Lake Baikal from Historical and Satellite Data: Relationship to Air Temperature, Dynamical, and Other Factors

Alexei V. Kouraev, Sergei V. Semovski, Michail N. Shimaraev, Nelly M. Mognard, Benoît Legrésy and Frédérique Rémy
Limnology and Oceanography
Vol. 52, No. 3 (May, 2007), pp. 1268-1286
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4499697
Page Count: 19
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • More info
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
The Ice Regime of Lake Baikal from Historical and Satellite Data: Relationship to Air Temperature, Dynamical, and Other Factors
Preview not available

Abstract

We give an overview of the history of the ice cover studies in Lake Baikal and a detailed description of the temporal and spatial variability of Lake Baikal ice conditions based on satellite and historical data. We analyze the long-term evolution of ice conditions using historical data and recent observations from satellite altimetry and radiometry for 1992-2004 for northern, middle, and southern Baikal. These data show a recent (since the 1990s) tendency for colder winters, with earlier ice formation, later ice break-up, and ice duration increase. These observations are in agreement with the long-period cycles of air temperature variability (warming between the 1970s and 1990s, with a cooling phase afterwards). We then compare air temperature data from meteorological stations to ERA-40 reanalysis and suggest that ERA-40 data can be used to assess seasonal and interannual changes of air temperature for Lake Baikal. The ERA-40 data also indicate a recent tendency for colder winters and for warmer summers. We further analyze how the ice regime is influenced by air temperature and how this influence is affected by dynamic (wind field, currents) and other (bathymetry, precipitation, etc.) factors. We estimate the relationship between air temperature parameters and the timing of ice events (ice formation and fast ice duration) and show that air temperature has the strongest effect on the ice regime. Dynamic and other factors interfere with the thermal influence, resulting in a change of ice formation dates and ice duration compared to the relationship that takes into account only the influence of air temperature.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1268
    1268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1269
    1269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1270
    1270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1271
    1271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1272
    1272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1273
    1273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1274
    1274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1275
    1275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1276
    1276
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1277
    1277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1278
    1278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1279
    1279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1280
    1280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1281
    1281
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1282
    1282
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1283
    1283
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1284
    1284
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1285
    1285
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1286
    1286
Part of Sustainability