Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Effect of Host-Plant Species on Adult Weight and the Reproductive Potential of Aphids

M. Llewellyn and V. K. Brown
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 54, No. 2 (Jun., 1985), pp. 639-650
DOI: 10.2307/4504
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4504
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effect of Host-Plant Species on Adult Weight and the Reproductive Potential of Aphids
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) In excess of 200 samples of adult aphids were collected from known host-plants in the field and up to twelve individuals of the alate and apterous morphs were weighed and their embryo content assessed. (2) Seventeen of the aphid species recorded were feeding on more than one host-plant and these data are used to study the effect of host-plant differences on both adult weight and an index of reproductive potential. (3) For alate morphs, seven of the eight comparisons indicate that adult weight is significantly affected by host-plant differences and 63% of the comparisons also indicate that embryo content is affected. (4) For apterous morphs, seventeen of the twenty-two comparisons show that host-plant influences adult weight and in 75% of the cases embryo content is likewise influenced. (5) The adult weight and embryo content of Aphis fabae and A. pomi decline during the summer, then increase. The influence of host-plants on these variables is discussed. (6) Adult weight and embryo content of the host-alternating A. fabae and Macrosiphum rosae are compared on their primary woody host-plant and the secondary herbaceous plant. Neither host provides a clear reproductive advantage over the other.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
639
    639
  • Thumbnail: Page 
640
    640
  • Thumbnail: Page 
641
    641
  • Thumbnail: Page 
642
    642
  • Thumbnail: Page 
643
    643
  • Thumbnail: Page 
644
    644
  • Thumbnail: Page 
645
    645
  • Thumbnail: Page 
646
    646
  • Thumbnail: Page 
647
    647
  • Thumbnail: Page 
648
    648
  • Thumbnail: Page 
649
    649
  • Thumbnail: Page 
650
    650