Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Stomach Sampling in the Yellow-Eyed Penguin: Erosion of Otoliths and Squid Beaks (Erosión de otolitos y picos de calamares en el estómago de Pingüinos (Megadyptes antipodes))

Yolanda van Heezik and Philip Seddon
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 60, No. 4 (Autumn, 1989), pp. 451-458
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4513468
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Stomach Sampling in the Yellow-Eyed Penguin: Erosion of Otoliths and Squid Beaks (Erosión de otolitos y picos de calamares en el estómago de Pingüinos (Megadyptes antipodes))
Preview not available

Abstract

Experimental feeding of Yellow-eyed Penguins (Megadyptes antipodes) with meals containing cephalopod beak pairs and otoliths of known weight, and subsequent flushing of stomachs at 2-48 h intervals after feeding, were carried out to determine the rate of digestion of beaks and otoliths. Otoliths and beaks were placed in HCl to observe changes. All otoliths were totally digested after 24 h in penguin stomachs, disappearance rate was inversely related to size of the otolith. After 24 h squid beaks showed increasing signs of wear, the extent of which was dependent on the presence or absence of small stones in the stomach. Experiments showed that HCl only causes otolith erosion at pH 1.5; erosion rate was twice as slow as in the stomachs. Acid had no effect on squid beaks after 78 h immersion. /// Se llevó a cabo alimentación experimental de pingüinos (Megadyptes antipodes) con comida previamente pesada que contenía otolitos y picos de cefalópodos, para determinar la velocidad de digestión de picos, y de picos-y-otolitos. Para determinar la velocidad de digestión se lavó el estómago de las aves utilizando la técnica de Wilson (1984) a intervalos de 2-48 h, una vez los pingüinos eran alimentados. Otolitos y picos fueron también colocados en HCl para observar cambios en estos. Los otolitos fueron totalmente digeridos luego de pasar 24 h en el estómago de los pingüinos. La velocidad de desaparición fue inversamente proporcional al tamaño del otolito. Después de 24 h los picos de los calamares mostraban signos de desgaste; la extención del desgaste estuvo relacionado con la presencia o ausencia de gúijaros en el estómago de los pingüinos. Los experimentos in vitro demostraron que el HCl solo causa erosión de los otolitos a un pH de 1.5; la velocidad de erosión resultó ser dos veces más lenta que en el estómago de los pingüinos. Los picos de calamares no se afectaron después de estar sumergidos por 78 h en ácido.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
451
    451
  • Thumbnail: Page 
452
    452
  • Thumbnail: Page 
453
    453
  • Thumbnail: Page 
454
    454
  • Thumbnail: Page 
455
    455
  • Thumbnail: Page 
456
    456
  • Thumbnail: Page 
457
    457
  • Thumbnail: Page 
458
    458