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Does Winter Bird Feeding Promote Dependency? (¿Promueve Dependencia la Alimentación de aves Durante el Invierno?)

Margaret C. Brittingham and Stanley A. Temple
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 63, No. 2 (Spring, 1992), pp. 190-194
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4513689
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Does Winter Bird Feeding Promote Dependency? (¿Promueve Dependencia la Alimentación de aves Durante el Invierno?)
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Abstract

Winter bird feeding is generally assumed to benefit the birds using this food source, but there are some potential risks associated with bird feeding. One is the risk that individuals using feeders may become overly dependent on this supplemental food supply and either fail to develop or lose the skills needed to forage efficiently on natural food when feeders are not available. Survival rates of a resident population of Black-capped Chickadees (Parus atricapillus) that were regular feeder users, and thus potentially dependent, were compared with those of a resident population of chickadees that had never been exposed to a bird feeder, during a winter when feeders were not available to either group. No difference was found between the average (±SD) monthly survival rates of chickadees that had used feeders in the past (0.84 ± 0.13) and those that had never used feeders (0.85 ± 0.12). There was no evidence that bird feeding promotes dependency. /// El alimentar aves en el invierno supuestamente beneficia a los pájaros que utilizan este recurso, aunque existen algunos riezgos asociados con tal alimentación. Uno es el riezgo de que el ave que utiliza comederos pueda crear dependencia de estos y pierda o no desarrolle adecuadamente las habilidades para forrajear eficientemente en el estado silvestre cuando no haya comederos. En este trabajo se compara una población residente de Parus atricapillus que regularmente utilizaba comederos (y que potencialmente había creado dependencia) con una población residente que nunca había estado expuesta a comederos, durante un invierno en que no hubo disponible para ninguno de los dos grupos comederos. No se encontró diferencia en la tasa promedio (±DE) de sobrevivencia mensual entre grupos que habían utilizado comederos (0.84 ± 0.13) y los que no lo habían utilizado nunca (0.85 ± 0.12). No se encontró evidencia que tienda a indicar que los comederos artificiales promuevan dependencia.

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