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Song Output as a Population Estimator: Effect of Male Pairing Status (El Canto Utilizado para Estimar el Tamaño de Poblaciones: El Efecto de Machos Apareados y No-apareados)

James P. Gibbs and Daniel G. Wenny
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 64, No. 3 (Summer, 1993), pp. 316-322
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4513823
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Song Output as a Population Estimator: Effect of Male Pairing Status (El Canto Utilizado para Estimar el Tamaño de Poblaciones: El Efecto de Machos Apareados y No-apareados)
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Abstract

Variation in song output of paired and unpaired, male Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapillus) and Kentucky Warblers (Oporornis formosus) was examined and its effect on estimates of population density derived from the spot-map survey technique. Song output during late-May and early-June in central Missouri averaged 3.5 times greater for 17 unpaired (1.74 songs/min) than 15 paired Ovenbirds (0.50 songs/min) and 5.4 times greater for 16 unpaired (2.22 songs/min) than 26 paired Kentucky Warblers (0.41 songs/min). Ten spot-map visits to known populations detected all unpaired males but missed 50% of paired male Ovenbirds and 35% of paired male Kentucky Warblers. A reliance on singing male contacts during spot-map surveys resulted in underestimation of population density and could confound assessments of habitat quality. /// Se estudió la variabilidad en la producción de cantos por parte de machos pareados y no-pareados de pizpita (Seiurus aurocapillus) y reinita de Kentucky (Oporornis formosus), para determinar su efecto en estimados de densidad poblacional utilizando la técnica de puntos en mapas (spot-map). La producción de cantos (durante el final de mayo y principios de junio) en la parte central de Missouri, resultó ser (en promedio) 3.5 veces mayor en 17 pizpitas no-apareadas (1.74 cantos/min) que en 15 individuos pareados (0.50 cantos/min) y 5.4 veces mayor para 16 reinitas de Kentucky no-apareadas (2.22 cantos/min) que en 26 de estas pareadas (0.41 cantos/min). Diez censos, utilizando la técnica de puntos en mapas, permitieron localizar todos los machos no-apareados, pero tan sólo al 50% de las pizpitas pareadas y el 35% de las reinitas de Kentucky con parejas. El utilizar el canto de machos para hacer censos, de tipo puntos en mapas, da lugar a subestimados, y puede traer confusión cuando se trata de determinar la calidad de un habitat.

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