Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Autumn Migration Route of Blackpoll Warblers: Evidence from Southeastern North America (Ruta tomada por Dendroica striata durante la migración otoñal: evidencia del sureste de Norte América)

Douglas B. McNair and William Post
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 64, No. 4 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 417-425
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4513849
Page Count: 9
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Autumn Migration Route of Blackpoll Warblers: Evidence from Southeastern North America (Ruta tomada por Dendroica striata durante la migración otoñal: evidencia del sureste de Norte América)
Preview not available

Abstract

Cooke (1904, 1915) proposed that the Blackpoll Warbler (Dendroica striata) migrates to South America through southeastern North America. Nisbet et al. (1963) and Nisbet (1970) argued that most Blackpoll Warblers fly directly from northeastern North America over the Atlantic Ocean to their winter range. Murray (1965, 1989) questioned this view and supported Cooke's hypothesis. Data from nocturnal accidents, banding stations and sightings demonstrate that Blackpoll Warblers are rare autumn migrants south of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, whereas north of Hatteras they are common. This evidence contradicts Cooke and Murray's hypothesis, and supports Nisbet's alternative. /// Cooke (1904, 1915) propuso que Dendroica striata migraba a Sur América a través del sureste de Norte América. Nisbet et al. (1963) y Nisbet (1970) argumentaron que la mayoría de estas aves volaban directamente del noreste de Norte América, hacia su lugar invernal, sobre el Atlántico. Murray (1965, 1989) puso en duda dicha hipótesis y apoyó lo propuesto por Cooke. Datos tomados de accidentes nocturnos, de estaciones de anillamiento y una serie de observaciones demuestran que el ave es un raro migrante otoñal al sur del Cabo de Hatteras y Carolina del Norte. Sin embargo, el ave es común al norte de Hatteras. La evidencia suministrada en este trabajo contradice lo propuesto por Cooke y Murray y apoya la hipótesis de Nisbet.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
417
    417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
418
    418
  • Thumbnail: Page 
419
    419
  • Thumbnail: Page 
420
    420
  • Thumbnail: Page 
421
    421
  • Thumbnail: Page 
422
    422
  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424
  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425