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Passive Relocation: A Method to Preserve Burrowing Owls on Disturbed Sites (Relocalización Pasiva: Un Método Para Preservar Individuos de Speotyto cunicularia en Lugares Disturbados)

Lynne A. Trulio
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 66, No. 1 (Winter, 1995), pp. 99-106
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4513987
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Passive Relocation: A Method to Preserve Burrowing Owls on Disturbed Sites (Relocalización Pasiva: Un Método Para Preservar Individuos de Speotyto cunicularia en Lugares Disturbados)
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Abstract

The Western Burrowing Owl (Speotyto cunicularia hypugaea) is declining throughout its range, in part as a result of urban development and other physical disturbances to owl burrows. One way to protect owls from disturbance is to allow birds to relocate to artificial burrows created in a safe location. This method, passive relocation of birds using artificial burrows, is described in detail and the results of passive relocations at six sites in northern California are presented. These results suggest that placing artificial burrows as close as possible but within approximately 100 m of burrows to be destroyed is expected to attract the evicted owls. Passive relocation appears to be a reliable way to move owls short distances and it presents fewer risks to birds than capturing and relocating them long distances. /// Las poblaciones de Speotyto cunicularia hypugaea están reduciéndose a través de su distribución, en parte como resultado del desarrollo urbano y de otros disturbios modernos a los huecos usados por estas lechuzas. Una forma de proteger las lechuzas de disturbios es permitir que estas se relocalicen en huecos artificiales establecidos en lugares protegidos. Se discuten la forma de relocalizar pasivamente las aves usando huecos artificiales y los resultados del uso de este método en seis lugares en el norte de California. Los resultados sugieren que colocar los huecos artificiales tan cerca como sea posible pero a un limite de 100 m de los nidos a destruirse deben atraer las lechuzas desalojadas. La relocalización pasiva parece ser un método razonable de mover lechuzas a cortas distancias que presenta menos riesgos a las aves que la captura y relocalización a distancias largas.

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