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Effects of Nasal Discs on Nesting by Mallards (Efecto de Discos Nasales en el Anidamiento de Anas platyrhynchos)

David W. Howerter, Brian L. Joynt, Robert B. Emery and Tomasz P. Sankowski
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 68, No. 1 (Winter, 1997), pp. 1-6
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4514185
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Nasal Discs on Nesting by Mallards (Efecto de Discos Nasales en el Anidamiento de Anas platyrhynchos)
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Abstract

Nasal markers (saddles and discs) are used commonly to identify individuals in studies of waterfowl ecology. The potential effects that these markers have on the study animals has been poorly tested for free-ranging birds. We examined the effects of nasal discs on several indices of nesting effort for wild Mallards in the prairie pothole region of south-central Canada. Nasal discs did not significantly influence the proportion of birds that remained on the study area, the proportion of birds that nested, the number of nests initiated per bird, the total number of days a given bird devoted to laying or incubating eggs, or the proportion of birds that successfully hatched a nest. Compared to unmarked birds, however, nasal-marked birds did significantly delay their first nest by 2-6 days. Investigators should carefully examine study objectives before deciding to nasal-mark individuals. /// En estudios de Anseriformes se utilizan marcadores nasales para identificar a los individuos. Los efectos potenciales de estos marcadores en las aves han sido pobremente estudiados en animales silvestres. Examinamos el efecto de discos nasales en varios índices del esfuerzo de anidamiento de individuos silvestres del pato Anas platyrhynchos. El estudio se llevó a cabo en la parte surcentral de Canada. Los discos nasales no tuvieron efecto en la proporción de aves que permaneción en el área de estudio, la proporción de aves que anidaron, el número de nidos iniciados por las aves, o la proporción de aves que empollaron sus huevos exitosamente. En comparación con aves que no fueron marcadas, los discos nasales causaron una dilación de 2-6 días en la primera anidada. Los investigadores deben examinar detalladamente sus objetivos previo a decidir utilizar marcadores nasales en este grupo de aves.

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