Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Mutual Mother-Pup Recognition in Galápagos Fur Seals and Sea Lions: Cues Used and Functional Significance

Fritz Trillmich
Behaviour
Vol. 78, No. 1/2 (1981), pp. 21-42
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4534129
Page Count: 22
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Mutual Mother-Pup Recognition in Galápagos Fur Seals and Sea Lions: Cues Used and Functional Significance
Preview not available

Abstract

Field observations on Galápagos fur seals and sea lions indicate mutual recognition between mother and pup. High calling activity and intensive interactions of mother and pup immediately after birth appear to establish recognition within the first few hours (mother) or days (pup) of birth. Females of both species nurse exclusively their own young and reject strange ones, sometimes very aggressively. The prompt reactions of pups to their mothers' Pup Attraction Calls (PACs) suggest that the mother too is individually recognized. The analysis of the PACs of mothers and the bleats of pups shows that interindividual variability of calls provides a sufficient basis for individual recognition in both species. Playback experiments with PACs of fur seals and sea lions show that pups (10 days to 2 years old) can discriminate between their mothers' and strange females' PACs. Mother recognition reduces the frequency of dangerous encounters of pups with strange females or allows pups to approach strangers especially careful, thus reducing the risk of injury. Only by means of individual recognition can females in crowded otariid rookeries limit maternal investment to their own offspring. The mechanism of individual recognition in dispersed, ice-breeding phocids and colonially breeding otarid seals may be different. /// Freilandbeobachtungen an Galápagos Seebären und Seelöwen weisen auf gegenseitiges individuelles Erkennen zwischen Mutter und Jungtier hin. Unmittelbar nach der Geburt rufen Mutter und Jungtier sehr viel und interagieren besonders intensiv. Die Mutter lernt so ihr Junges bereits nach wenigen Stunden zu erkennen, das Junge die Mutter nach wenigen Tagen. Weibchen beider Arten säugen ausschließlich ihr eigenes Junges und weisen fremde mitunter sehr aggressiv ab. Dabei können Junge zu Tode kommen. Die Lockrufe der Weibchen und die Antwortrufe der Jungen beider Arten variieren interindividuell sehr. Dies stellt eine ausreichende Basis für individuelles Erkennen dar. In Vorspielexperimenten mit Lockrufen von Müttern beider Arten unterschieden die Jungen (im Alter zwischen 10 Tagen und 2 Jahren) fast ausnahmslos zwischen den Lockrufen der Mutter und denen fremder Weibchen. Diese Unterscheidungshähigkeit hilft den Jungen fremde Weibchen zu vermeiden oder sich solchen Weibchen besonders vorsichtig annähern zu können. Die Weibchen können durch individuelles Erkennen ihres eigenen Jungen ihre Brutpflege ausschließlich auf diese beschränken. Die Mechanismen des individuellen Erkennens sind bei verstreut auf dem Eis sich fortpflanzenden Hundsrobben (Phocidae) möglicherweise andere als bei Ohrenrobben (Otariidae), die sich in dichten Kolonien an Land fortpflanzen.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[21]
    [21]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42