Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Timing of Offspring Recognition in Adult Starlings

Linda van Elsacker, Rianne Pinxten and Rudolf Frans Verheyen
Behaviour
Vol. 107, No. 1/2 (Nov., 1988), pp. 122-130
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4534723
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Timing of Offspring Recognition in Adult Starlings
Preview not available

Abstract

1. In the Exchange experiments adult starlings feed a strange brood, introduced at their original nest site up to 16 days post hatch, as frequent as their own young, resulting in a normal weight gain of the strange young. 2. Confronted with a 19 day old alien brood and their own young simultaneously, some adults still occasionally feed the strange young while others are already able to restrict their parental care to their own offspring. 3. Not until the young are aged 20 days or more, the adults are definitely able to discriminate between own and alien young in the immediate vicinity of the original nesting hole (Choice experiments) or within 10 to 20 m (Search experiments). 4. The experiments altogether show that offspring recognition in Starlings develops only a few days prior to fledging, i.e. by the time the young run the risk of intermingling with other conspecific broods. /// 1. De nos expériences d'échange, il apparaît que l'étourneau adulte adopte et nourrit les poussins d'autrui, placés dans son propre nid, jusqu' à l'âge de 16 jours après l'éclosion, avec la même fréquence que ses propres poussins, de sorte que leur poids augmente normalement. 2. Confrontés simultanément avec une nichée étrangère de 19 jours et avec leurs propres jeunes, certains adultes continuent à nourrir les poussins d'autrui tandis que d'autres sont déjà en mesure de limiter leur soin parental à leurs propres jeunes. 3. Ce n'est qu'à partir de l'âge de 20 jours après l'éclosion que les adultes sont en mesure de discerner les poussins soit à la proximité du nid (expériences de choix) soit à une distance de 10 à 20 mètres (expériences de recherche). 4. L'ensemble de nos expériences démontre que seulement quelques jours avant l'envol, les adultes sont capables de reconnaître leurs jeunes, c'est à dire au moment où les jeunes risquent se mélanger avec des congénères.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[122]
    [122]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
125
    125
  • Thumbnail: Page 
126
    126
  • Thumbnail: Page 
127
    127
  • Thumbnail: Page 
128
    128
  • Thumbnail: Page 
129
    129
  • Thumbnail: Page 
130
    130