If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Parental Care in the Subsocial Intertidal Beetle, Bledius spectabilis, in Relation to Parasitism by the Ichneumonid Wasp, Barycnemis blediator

T. D. Wyatt and W. A. Foster
Behaviour
Vol. 110, No. 1/4 (Oct., 1989), pp. 76-92
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4534785
Page Count: 17
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Parental Care in the Subsocial Intertidal Beetle, Bledius spectabilis, in Relation to Parasitism by the Ichneumonid Wasp, Barycnemis blediator
Preview not available

Abstract

The parasitic wasp Barycnemis blediator (Aubert) is an important natural enemy of the subsocial saltmarsh beetle Bledius spectabilis Kratz: the wasp occurs at high densities (up to 100 coccoons m-2), it is very widely distributed among the beetle colonies, and life-table analysis shows that up to 15% of the immature stages can be killed by the wasp. To determine whether the mother beetle can protect her young against parasitism, we recorded in the field the reactions of individual wasps to burrows that contained either a single adult beetle, an adult and young (the larvae leave the maternal burrow about halfway through the 1st instar) or individual 1st, 2nd or 3rd instars. The wasps only went down those burrows that contained a single, post-dispersal Bledius larva, except once in 132 observations when a wasp was observed to go down a maternal burrow containing a female, eggs and larvae. On all other occasions, burrows containing adult Bledius were not entered by the wasp. None of the five hundred 1st instar larvae collected from maternal burrows in the field was parasitized. This was not because 1st instars in maternal burrows are unattractive or unsuitable for the wasp: field experiments showed that the wasps were highly successful in parasitizing 1st instar larvae taken from maternal burrows and placed in experimental burrows. Field experiments showed that the success rate of parasitism by the wasp was much higher with 1st instars (94%) than with 2nd (69%) or 3rd (35%) instars. We suggest that an important consequence of parental care in Bledius spectabilis is that the young are protected from attack by the parasitic wasp Barycnemis blediator for most of their most vulnerable phase (the 1st instar). /// L'hyménoptère parasite Barycnemis blediator (Aubert) est un ennemi naturel important du staphylin subsocial des marais salants, Bledius spectabilis Kratz. Il est largement distribué au soin des colonies de B. spectabilis, avec des densités élevées (jusqu'à 100 $\text{cocons}/{\rm m}^{2}$); l'analyse des tables de survie montre que jusqu'à 15% des stades immatures du staphylin peuvent être tués par l'ichneumonide. Pour déterminer si la femelle du staphylin peut protéger sa descendance contre le parasitisme, nous avons relevé dans la nature les réactions individuelles des guêpes parasites à des terriers contenant, soit un seul staphylin adulte, soit un adulte et sa descendance (les larves quittent le terrier maternel à peu près au milieu du 1er stade larvaire), soit des larves du 1er, 2ème ou 3ème stade. Les femelles de B. blediator ne pénètrent que dans les terriers qui contiennent une seule larve de Bledius (après que celle-ci ait quitté le terrier maternel), excepté un cas sur 132 observations, où une guêpe parasite est entrée dans un terrier contenant une femelle, des oeufs et des larves; dans tous les autres cas, les terriers contenant un Bledius adulte n'ont pas été visités. Aucune des 500 larves collectées sur le terrain dans les terriers maternels n'était parasitée. Ces larves ne sont pas pour autant non-attractives ou inadéquates pour B. blediator; des expériences faites sur le terrain ont en effet montré que l'ichneumonide parasite avec grand succès des larves du 1er stade prélevées dans un terrier maternel et placées dans un terrier expérimental. D'autres expériences de terrain ont montré que le taux de succès du parasitisme par B. blediator est beaucoup plus élevé pour des larves du 1er stade (94%) que pour des larves du 2ème stade (69%) ou du 3ème (35%). Nous suggérons qu'une conséquence importante des soins parentaux chez B. spectabilis est la protection des larves contre l'attaque de l'hyménoptère parasite B. blediator, précisément au stade de développement où elles sont le plus vulnérables (le 1er stade).

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[76]
    [76]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92