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Journal Article

Occurrence of Microtralia ovula and Creedonia succinea (Gastropoda: Pulmonata: Ellobiidae) in South Carolina

Julian R. Harrison and David M. Knott
Southeastern Naturalist
Vol. 6, No. 1 (2007), pp. 173-178
Published by: Eagle Hill Institute
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4540990
Page Count: 6

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Topics: Species, Oysters, Mollusks, Marine resources, Salt marshes, Biological taxonomies, Coasts, Gulfs
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Occurrence of Microtralia ovula and Creedonia succinea (Gastropoda: Pulmonata: Ellobiidae) in South Carolina
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Abstract

Gastropods in the family Ellobiidae are a cryptic and easily overlooked component of intertidal habitats in South Carolina salt marshes. Recent and archived collections reveal the presence of two ellobiid species, Microtralia ovula and Creedonia succinea, which are established and occasionally abundant in the mid- to upper-intertidal zone on oyster reefs and under wrack on washed shell banks. These species are previously known to occur only in Bermuda, southern Florida, the Bahamas, the Greater Antilles, and Mexico. This note reports a significant northward extension of their known range and acknowledges that similar distributional shifts are being more widely recognized for estuarine benthic fauna along the US Atlantic coast.

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